Boring Bar will not Repeat on Bore Size

July 1st, 2016

A very common concern with any boring bar is that the bar sometimes will not repeat on bored size. This can be caused by one a few different things, or a combination of more than one.

You set your mike and bore a hole and find the hole is oversized, you reset the mike and the next hole is then undersized, obviously there is something that is not right.

First thing we would look for are scores or scratches in the micometer face. If the mike is damaged, the bar will not repeat.The mike should be returned to KW and the face reground and repaired.

Micrometer stem bend, will cause the same problems depending on the amount of bend and the amount of stock to be removed. A quick way to determine if the stem is bent is to insert a feeler gauge (.002) between the face of the mike and the tool bit, then tighten the bit. The feeler gauge should stay in place, and if you slowy rotate the mike in the boring head, the tension in the feeler gauge should not increse or decrease. If it does, the stem is bent and requires replacement.

Another thing to check is if the micrometer not locating into the boring head correctly. The stem of the mike has a V-groove in it which works with a spring loaded ball bearing to insure correct position of the mike into the head every time. If the groove is worn or the ball is out of adjustment, the bar will not repeat on size. The micrometer should "snap" into the head and when slight rearward pressure is applied, the mike should snap back into the boring head. If it does not the ball positon will need to be adjusted. Contact Tech Services for assistance in this case.

If you tighten the tool bit and the tool bit moves away from the feeler gauge, and the feeler becomes loose, there is a different problem. Either the tool gib, tool holder or boring head is worn. You can examine the tool holder quite easily by simply checking the angle where the gib plate contacts the tool holder for visable wear and also feel it for any step. If worn, it will require replacement. You will need to remove the gib from the boring head to examine it for wear also, if the tool holder is worn, it is likely the gib will be worn also.

Boring Bar will not Repeat on Bore Size

The boring head can also be worn, and cause the same problem as the tool gib or holder. If the boring head is worn, then the head will need to be replaced. Rebuilding a boring head is only something that the factory can do, and all heads may not be repairable. A combination of two or more of these concerns may be found on the same machine. These findings are normally on very old or high service units.

These are but a few possible causes for potential boring errors in bore size.

As always please contact KW Tech services for further help if required.

 

Checking Valve Refacer Chuck Runout

February 7th, 2012

Valve Grinder Chuck Inspection

Chuck accuracy is critical to producing a quality valve job.

Most O.E.M.'s require a valve face run-out to be below .0015. To accomplish this, the chuck in a valve grinder must not only run-out below .0015, but must repeat this every time.

High performance engines require even greater accuracy. In some cases run-out must be below .0005.

How do you determine the accuracy of the chuck in your machine? There is basically one easy method that can be used which provides an accurate evaluation.

Start by finding a known round and straight part. A valve seat pilot, carbide if you have one will work very well. If you do not have one, use a section of drill rod that is straight and round. This will be your test piece.

  1. Insert the test piece into the chuck so that it is gripped correctly and has at least two inches of protrusion past the face of the chuck.
  2. Install a dial indicator (.0000 reading if possible) so as to have the plunger contact the test piece one inch from the face of the chuck.
  3. Turn the machine on and observe the indicator as the chuck is rotating. The reading at this point should not exceed .0015.

If the reading is inexcess of the .0015, you can first disassemble the chuck and clean it thoroughly. (Follow directions given in the machine manual). Examine the ramps on which the ball bearings ride, if wear is evident (grooves), the chuck will require placement. Kwik-Way provides new chucks that have less than .0005 run out and for the standard SVSIID and a Hi-Performance version with less than .0002 run out.

If you have any quesitons in regards to chuck performance, or if you need a replacement chuck, contact;

Kwik-Way Tech Services at 800-553-5953.

Valve Chuck Disassembly / Assembly Instructions

January 31st, 2012

4mm Valve Chuck Disassembly / Assembly Tool

PN: 012-1054-60

[This tool is required to perform the following operations]


Disassembly Instructions

STEP 1: Remove the chuck cover from the Chuck Bearing Assembly, being careful not to pull any wires from the cover.. Rotate the Chuck so that the Grind Mark on the front collar and the Yellow Mark on the Spring are Vertical as show in the photo below.

STEP 2: Remove the (3) three 8 x 32 x 5/16 slot head screws from the Chuck End Cap (Black) shown below.

STEP 3: Use the Disassembly Tool (picture at the top of this document) which is standard equipment with your machine, put the 8 x 32 screws (3) into the chuck shaft in a 1/4 of an inch. Put the 1/4 x 20 Hex Head Bolt finger tight against the End Plate.

STEP 4: Remove the Chuck Yoke.

STEP 5: Loosen the 1/4 x 20 Hex head bolt counter clockwise. As you release the 1/4 x 20 bolt, the spring pressure should begin to release.. NOTE: You may need to soak the chuck in Automatic Transmission Fluid to remove grit and make the collars slide easier.

STEP 6: Remove the Chuck Disassembly Tool.

STEP 7: Begin to remove the outer collar from the chuck shaft. Next, remove the Loading Cup with the Four (4) springs. The large spring and inner collar will be removed along with the Thrust Step Washer. As you take the Inner collar off the steel chuck balls(9/16) may fall out of the chuck shaft.

STEP 8: Remove the Chuck Handwheel and belt from the chuck shaft. Remove the chuck from the chuck bearing assembly. Clean all parts with a parts cleaning solvent.


Assembly Instructions

STEP 9: (1) Put the shaft back in the chuck bearing slide, use transmission fluid only and coat the chuck shaft. Make sure the keys are vertical.

(2) Put the thrust washer, spring, and (3) three rear balls back on the chuck shaft, making sure that the Yellow mark is lined up with the Keys. hold on to the bottom balls so they don't fall out of the shaft.

(3) Slide on the Inner collar, so all three rear balls are inside of the collar.

(4) Put the front set of balls in the shaft. Install the loading cup with four(4) springs facing out.

(5) Install the outer collar, making sure the grind mark is lined up with the keyways.

(6) Reinstall the Disassembly tool. Put the three screws (8 x 32) in one quarter (1/4) of an inch. Begin to tighten the 1/4 x 20 bolt, making sure that the collars are still lined up with the keys. Run 1/4 x 20 bolt in until it is tight.

(7) Reinstall the Chuck Yoke.

(8) Remove the Disassembly Tool and reinstall the chuck End Cap with the three 8 x 32 screws.

(9) Reinstall the chuck Handwheel and Belt, making sure the chuck and chuck handwheel are snug to the chuck bearing slide.

(10) Reinstall the chuck cover. Make sure there are no wires touching the chuck.

Kwik-Way History

February 22nd, 2017
Kwik-Way History

Kwik-Way Industries, Inc., began as the Cedar Rapids Engineering Company in 1920, providing a product sorely needed by the fledg­ling automobile and truck indus­try—a reliable, standardized way to reface engine valves. Until the Kwik-Way valve refacing machine was marketed, that process was per­formed, with difficulty, by hand. Charles C. Hahn, founder of the company, was a former blacksmith's apprentice who appreciated auto­mobiles and wanted to solve some of their engine problems, such as valves warped by heat and wear. He queried machine tool makers around the country who not only lacked a lathe "chuck" to fit his needs but flatly told Hahn that such a tool couldn't be built. 

Hahn persevered, however, and with R.H. Meister, an experienced machinist, founded Cedar Rapids Engineering Company. The partners hired a creative mechanical engineer, A.I. Dunn, and between them, the trio designed the chuck needed to reface engine valves. The device worked and the Kwik-Way valve facing machine was born.

The firm's first modest office and shop was located at 902 Seven­ teenth Street Northeast in Cedar Rapids, and measured only 20 by 20 feet. However, the new product caught on fast throughout the United States and the business grew. The company's first salesman was I.R. Goodwin, an energetic young man who made his money the hard way—covering the dusty roads of Nebraska, North and South Dakota, and northwestern Iowa by automo­bile, peddling his wares primarily to garages.

During World War II, Cedar Rapids Engineering Company put its close-tolerance machining skills to work grinding radio crystals for the Allied defense effort. As the com­pany continued to expand, an eye was cast toward foreign markets. Although some sales had been made overseas almost by accident, it wasn't until 1962 that Kwik-Way machines were marketed abroad directly by Cedar Rapids Engineer­ing Company. That year, overseas sales totaled $68,000; today, that annual figure amounts to several million dollars.

After Charles Hahn's death in the 1940s, control of the enterprise was assumed, first by his partner, R.H. Meister, and then by Hahn's two sons, F. Critz and H. Cedric. In 1968, Cedar Rapids Engineering Company was merged into the newly formed Kwik-Way Industries, Inc., headed by Thomas A. Parks and a new professional management team. The company acquired a Canadian firm in 1969, now called Kwik - Way Manufacturing of Canada, Ltd. In late 1973, Material Products Company, a steel fabricat­ing firm, and Line-O-Tronics, Inc., maker of auto front-end alignment tools and wheel balancers, were ac­quired. Today Kwik-Way manufac­tures the automotive industry's most complete line of repair machinery.

A large industrial facility was built and occupied at 500 Fifty-seventh Street, Marion, in 1976. In 1 9 8 0 , the company employs approximately 300 people through its Marion facility, 140 at Rock Is­land, Illinois, and 50 at its facility at Toronto, Canada.

How to Identify Which Valve Refacer You Have

February 7th, 2012

By far, the best way to determine which model of Valve Refacer you have is to give your serial number to the Kwik-Way Representative when you call in. The Serial number is located above the 15 degree mark on the angle gauge of all but the very oldest valve refacers. For most of them there will be a letter D or S after the first letters of SVS, but some of the really old units might have a number like "KK 234". Regardless, if you give the entire set of letters and numbers to a Kwik-Way Representative, they will be able to insure that you are getting the correct parts or consumables for your particular model of Valve Refacer.

Here is a photo of a 2009 production serial number.

 

 

Here are some other things that will help you identify your SVS valve refacer.

Early SVS SVSII D (Deluxe) SVSII S (Standard)
Serial Numbers:202-2681 SNs: 3,003-5173; 10,000(KWP) and up. SNs: 10,003-10,166
Air Operated Chuck Air Operated Chuck Lever Operated Chuck
Variable Speed Chuck Variable Speed Chuck One Speed Chuck
Aluminum Chuck Cover Plastic Chuck Cover Plastic Chuck Cover
Rubber Mat on Chuck Cover No Rubber Mat on Chuck Cover No Rubber Mat on Chuck Cover
Does not have a valve counter

Valve counter present

Does not have a valve counter.